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Researcher Gallery

Teresa Dillon

© TU Berlin/PR/Philipp Arnoldt

Former member of Trinity College Dublin, Ireland

Research Interests:
Sound, Urban Governance, Art, Electromagnetic Spectrum

Research Project at TU Berlin:

In government agencies, institutes and research institutions as well as in ateliers and sound studios the sounds and noises of the city are measured, analyzed and evaluated or, through surprisingly new perspectives, transformed into sound installations or sound works. Dr. Theresa Dillon investigates how noise narratives and anti-noise-pollution measures develop within a city and in what ways politics, the administration and the artistic community get involved with these complex narratives and retell them interactively. Dr. Dillon is an academically qualified psychologist and artist, who has dealt with the reception and artistic performance of sound in the public urban space for years. Her works have been presented at festivals and exhibitions such as 'Transmediale', 'Ars Electronica' and 'Eco City Summer'. In Berlin Dr. Dillon discovered a scene of people engaged in art as well as in the administration, in architectural offices, institutions and research institutes, who showed a great willingness to deal critically and creatively with the given urban situation and trace its complex room-sound relationships. Dr. Dillon's project is all about investigating the various strategies and work methods of these diverse expert groups. An artistic production on the subject of sound, noise, city and urban governance to be published and presented at conferences will conclude her research project.

Stay at TU Berlin: Alexander von Humboldt Fellow from December 2014 to April 2016

Partner: Professor Dr. Stefan Weinzierl, TU Berlin, Faculty I – Humanities and Educational Sciences, Department of Language and Communication, Sub-Department of Audio Communication, and Professor Dr. Martin Supper, Berlin University of the Arts (UdK), Studio for Electroacoustic Music & Sound Art

Theresa Dillon

Audio Communication

Sound Studies

Alexandre Ciaccafava

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

PhD, former member of the Centre national de la recherche scientifique ( CNRS), Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines, Institut de Microbiologie de la Méditerranée, Marseille, France

Research Interests:
Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, hydrogenase, biofuel cells, Electrochemistry, spectroscopy

Research Project at TU Berlin:

Dr. Alexandre Ciaccafava's project is closely linked to one of the biggest challenges facing the Natural Sciences today – finding new approaches to solving the energy crisis. This involves, in particular, the development of renewable energies that simultaneously reduce CO2 emissions. Strategies for this can be found in nature, which provides new approaches for the effective conversion of CO2 to CO. Carbon monoxide serves as the basis for producing higher-valent hydrocarbons for fuels, although it is also used as a carbon and energy source by some aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. As part of his research, Dr. Ciaccafava is exploring two types of bacteria – Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans and Oligotropha carboxidovorans – which, with the aid of special enzymes, namely the so-called carbon monoxide dehydrogenases, are able effectively to convert CO2 to CO. The catalytically active site of these enzymes contains several transition metals, which allow the conversion of CO2 through the interaction of several – still partially unknown – factors. Research on these factors is essential for transferring this enzyme function to other systems, which are then also suitable for technological application. The goal of this research project is to understand the basics of the mechanism of enzyme catalysis. As catalysis takes place extremely fast, special vibrational-spectroscopic techniques are used in order address the complex question.

Stay at TU Berlin: Research fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation from August 2013 to July 2016

Host: Professor Dr. Peter Hildebrandt, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Chair of Physical Chemistry / Biophysical Chemistry

Patricio Andrés González Navarrete

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Universitat Jaume I (UJI) in Castellón de la Plana, Spain, and Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC) in Paris, France

Research Interests:
Computational Chemistry, Gas-Phase Chemistry, reaction mechanism, electron localization function, topological analysis of the electron density

Research Project at TU Berlin:

The research project of the Chilean Patricio Andrés González Navarrete focuses on relevant insights into the molecular mechanism of ethanol oxidation. Biomass-based ethanol is increasingly being classified as a promising, renewable resource that could replace the shrinking petrochemical reserves. By selecting appropriate catalysts and reaction conditions, ethanol can be selectively converted to acetaldehyde, acetic acid, ethylene oxide, ethylene, diethyl ether and ethyl acetate. Above all, ethanol can be used as a renewable fuel for the conversion to benzine. Methodically, González Navarrete is trying to combine processes used in experimental chemistry with the methods of quantum chemistry.

Stay at TU Berlin: Research fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation from February 2014 to January 2016

Hosts: Professor Dr. Helmut Schwarz and Dr. Maria Schlangen-Ahl, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Chair of Physical Organic Chemistry


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Jesús Casquete

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Professor of History of Political Thought at the Faculty of Social and Communication Sciences, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Leioa, Spain

Research Interests:
Nationalism, collective action, totalitarianism, Basque Studies, National Socialism, Cultural History, political violence and terrorism, social movements, Weimar Republic, and Social History
    
Current Research Project:
Taking the paradigmatic example of Nazi Germany's National Socialist movement, Professor Jesús Casquet investigates the strategic methods and instruments used by totalitarian movements for the emotional mobilization of citizens. An indispensable instrument to mobilize the masses is the 'martyr' figure, which serves as a model for the 'new man' who has to be capable of making a martyr of himself for the benefit of the 'nation', 'race' or 'Volksgemeinschaft' ('ethnic community'). A special focus of Professor Jesús Casquete's research work is the investigation of contemporary sources. Looking for stereotypical language and interpretive schemes, he analyzes newspapers, diaries, biographies, novels, archive material and the rhetoric of orators like Goebbels and Hitler.

Stay at TU Berlin: From 2001 to 2002, Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at the Berlin Social Science Center, since then short research stays in Berlin, most recently in 2014 at TU Berlin's Center for Research on Antisemitism (ZfA).

Host: Professor Dr. Stefanie Schüler-Springorum, TU Berlin, Faculty I: Humanities, Director of the Center for Research on Antisemitism


Ingrid Koslow

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

University of California, Santa Barbara, Materials Department, California, United States

Research Interests:
Physics, Solid State Physics, Materials Science, Condensed Matter Physics

Research Project at TU Berlin:

The research work of Dr. Ingrid Koslow is targeted at controlling the formation of nanostructures on an atomic scale, thus tailoring their properties for application in innovative light emitters and electronic components. She is especially interested in the development of (In)AlGaN quantum-film, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers for the green or ultraviolet spectral region, where efficiency is still very low. Dr. Koslow is trying to find out which fundamental, physical material properties have the greatest influence on efficiency and how these properties can be controlled through growth processes.

Stay at TU Berlin: Humboldt Research Fellowship for Postdoctoral Researchers from June 2013 to June 2015

Host: Professor Dr. Michael Kneissl, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Department of Solid-State Physics, Chair of Experimental Nanophysics and Photonics, Director of the GaN Optoelectronics Division at the Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik (FBH)

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Nicole Joy Rijs

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia

Research Interests: Reaction kinetics, catalysis, clusters, gas phase, metal catalyst, organofluorine

Research Project at TU Berlin:

Dr. Nicole Rijs wishes to investigate more closely the behavior of organic molecules, which, in addition to elements such as hydrogen and carbon, also contain fluorine. In particular, she is looking for ways to synthesize these molecules in a targeted way by means of metal catalysts or metal reagents. Nowadays, artificial fluorine compounds are used for the production of analgesics and anesthetics in medicine, fertilizers in agriculture, and polymers in industry or materials science. In addition to the acquisition of fundamental knowledge, Dr. Rijs' research is therefore also of particular importance for the more efficient and cost-effective processing of these substances.

Stay at TU Berlin: Alexander von Humboldt Fellow from April 2013 to March 2015

Hosts:
Professor Dr. Dres. Helmut Schwarz and Dr. Maria Schlangen, TU Berlin, Department of Chemistry, Chair of Physical Organic Chemistry, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences
 

Laurent Bulteau

© Tu Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique (INRIA), Lyon, France

Research Interests:
Algorithmic Theory (complexity, fixed parameter tractability, etc.) for problems based on graphs, strings or permutations

Research Project at TU Berlin:

Dr. Laurent Bulteau, a specialist in complexity theory, concerns himself with finding efficient algorithms for highly complex computational problems, for example in order to calculate the shortest travel route through several cities or to determine the most essential junction points for a network. Often this involves researching what algorithmically is only just doable, thus pushing at the frontiers of computer science, for example by identifying computational problems that could only be solved with infeasible computing resources. Herein lies one of Dr. Bulteau's greatest achievements so far, namely, his identification of the immense complexity of the so-called 'pancake problem', for which, because of the required computation time or storage capacity, there will probably never be an efficient algorithm. For this discovery he was awarded in 2013 the 2nd prize for the best dissertation in the field of Computer Science in France.
In his work, Dr. Bulteau continuously focuses on alternative algorithms that approach the optimal problem solution – a development which in bioinformatics enables important conclusions in fields of application such as genetics and the behavior of the chromosomes of a species of living organisms in the course of evolution.

Stay at TU Berlin: Research fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation from October 2013 to March 2015

Host: Professor Dr. Rolf Niedermeier, TU Berlin, Faculty IV: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Software Engineering and Theoretical Computer Science, Chair of Algorithmics and Computational Complexity

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Wei ZESONG

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Professor at the School of Architecture and Design / Beijing Jiaotong University, China

Research Interests:
Architecture, urban and landscape design and theory

Research Project at TU Berlin:

The architect Professor Dr. WEI, Zesong from the School of Architecture and Design at Beijing Jiaotong University concerns herself with the problem of severe environmental pollution in metropolises. The starting point of her work is the hypothesis that cities are subject to dynamic, mutually dependent changes. She occupies herself with the 'Urban Gallery', a planning tool and decision aid, which makes it possible to look at a specific territory, identify elements therein, and recognize problems and possibilities in the urban context. The method consists of different levels which contribute to understanding a territory and acting in it. These levels are designed in such a way that inclusive discussions can be conducted, spatial, economic, political and social aspects can be integrated in a sustainable manner, and complex dynamics such as Smart City developments can be controlled.

Stay at TU Berlin: Scholarship holder of the 'China Scholarship Council' (CSC) from January 2014 to February 2015

Host: Professor Dr. Raoul Bundschoten, TU Berlin, Faculty VI: Planning – Building – Environment, Department of Architecture, Chair of Sustainable Urban Planning and Urban Design


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Magdalena Woznica

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Assistant Professor at the Institute of Organic Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, Poland

Research Interests:
Green chemistry, sunlight-driven chemical reactions

Research Project at TU Berlin:

Dr. Magdalena Woznica conducts research on new sorts of catalysts, which are based not on metal but on graphitic carbon nitride polymer. This research is in line with the trend within modern synthetic-organic chemistry to search for environment-friendly solutions in different fields such as energy generation, degradation of pollutants, and organic synthesis. Particularly in the pharmaceutical industry it is necessary to replace catalysts that are frequently used in the synthesis of medicinal drugs and consist of costly and toxic metals – such as germanium, ruthenium, iridium, gold and silver – with substances that are less harmful to health and less expensive. Dr. Woznica's project concerns itself with the use of sunlight as an inexhaustible energy source for the conduction of chemical reactions. For this purpose, graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4) is used as a so-called photocatalyst. It is able to directly convert light energy to chemical energy. Based on this principle, a variety of reactions such as oxidations and reductions can be realized in an environment-friendly and cost-efficient way.

Stay at TU Berlin: From April 2013 to February 2014, research scholarship from TU Berlin; from February 2014 to January 2015, research fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Host: Professor Dr. rer. nat. Siegfried Blechert, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Chair of Organic Chemistry / Natural Product Synthesis


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Erick Treviño Aguilar

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Assistant Professor, Department of Economics and Finance at the University of Guanajuato, Mexico

Research Interests:  Stochastic analysis and its applications in Mathematical Finance

Research Project at TU Berlin:
Dr. Erick Treviño Aguilar's research project aims at developing a new multi-asset model for price effects and analyzing new kinds of mathematical methods in order to master stochastic optimization problems arising in the context of finding an optimal trading order. This is expected to open up new paths to help better calculate the costly placing of orders for large transactions.

Stay at TU Berlin: Research fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation from February 2013 to January 2015


Host:
Professor Dr. Peter Bank, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Department of Mathematics, Office MA 7-1, Chair of Mathematical Finance

Muna Ali Abdalla Mohamed

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Assistant Professor at the Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Khartoum, Sudan

Research Interests:
Natural Products Chemistry or Biological Chemistry, isolation and structural elucidation of anticancer and antiplasmodium new and novel metabolites


Research Project at TU Berlin:
During her research stay at TU Berlin, Dr. Muna Abdalla, as part of Professor Roderich Süßmuth's research group, concerns herself with the isolation and characterization of new compounds both between Streptomyces strains and metabolites from Sudanese endophytic microorganisms. For this purpose, bacterial and fungal strains from Sudanese medicinal plants, which for centuries have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of diseases, have been isolated. Larger extracts from these are being prepared for chromatographic analysis and further spectroscopic techniques in order to elucidate the novel, bioactive structures.

Stay at TU Berlin: Georg Forster Research Fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation from January 2013 to January 2015

Host: Professor Dr. Roderich Süßmuth, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Chair of Organic Chemistry, Group: Synthetic Biotechnology and Antibiotics

WU Xiao-Nan

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, Beijing, China

Research Interests:
Reaction kinetics, catalysis, C-H bond activation, Density Functional Theory, FT-ICR, oxide clusters, oxygen-centered radical, oxygen-rich Au-doped transition-metal

Research Project at TU Berlin:
The chemical community likes to refer to the directed activation and functionalization of hydrocarbon compounds as the 'Holy Grail'. "If I ever find it, it will be in the research group of Professor Helmut Schwarz," says Dr. WU Xiao-Han. "The group has produced a very large number of excellent results in the fields of mass spectrometry, gas-phase chemistry and organometallic chemistry, especially with regard to research on the activation of hydrocarbons. I hope to make further progress at TU Berlin." The molecular reconstruction of saturated hydrocarbons from fossil or biological sources into energetically more valuable raw materials is a key challenge in order to solve global energy problems. Concretely, Dr. WU Xiao-Nan's research project concerns itself with mass-spectroscopic studies on the reactivity and structure of gaseous metal-oxide clusters in order to develop modeling systems for the activation of hydrocarbon compounds and other catalytic oxidation processes.

Stay at TU Berlin: Alexander von Humboldt Fellow from January 2013 to December 2014

Hosts: Professor Dr. Dres. Helmut Schwarz and Dr. Maria Schlangen-Ahl, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Chair of Physical Organic Chemistry



Thomas Fallon

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

Research Interests: Organic Chemistry, arene insertion reactions, stable siylenes

Research Project at TU Berlin:
In his research work Dr. Thomas Fallon is trying to find ways of synthesizing specific molecules more elegantly, effectively and, above all, cost-efficiently. His research project at TU Berlin concerns itself with the production of novel silicon reagents, whose reactivity could clear the path to the activation of normally stable carbon-carbon multiple-bond systems. Until now, the envisioned target structures have only been predicted, while a synthesis pathway in the laboratory remains to be found. Dr. Thomas Fallon is fascinated by independent minds who are guided exclusively by their research interests and set themselves very high standards. He says: "I was lucky to have encountered such scientific minds both in my doctoral advisor, Professor Michael S. Sherburn from the Australian National University, and in Professor Martin Oestreich, and that I have the opportunity of working with, and learning from, them."

Stay at TU Berlin:
Alexander von Humboldt Fellow from May 2013 to October 2014

Host:
Professor Dr. Martin Oestreich, Einstein Professor, TU Berlin, Department of Chemistry, Chair of Organic Chemistry / Synthesis and Catalysis


Victoria Paternostro

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Matemática, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Argentina

Research Interests:
Numerical analysis, frames, non-linear approximation, representation systems, shearlets, wavelets

 

 

Research Project at TU Berlin:
Victoria Paternostro, PhD, occupies herself with an area of applied functional analysis, which plays an ever-growing role in the solution of problems in mathematical signal and image processing, namely shearlets. These systems are an extension of wavelets, which are the basis of the widely known compression standard JPEG2000. Shearlets were developed by scientists of from the working group for Applied Functional Analysis at TU Berlin and have become one of the key instruments nowadays for analyzing image data, in particular.
Dr. Paternostro's research project aims at setting the theoretical basics for shearlet algorithms with distinctly localized shearlets, for example for the improved detection of frame borders or the extraction of specific image elements. This task poses a great challenge, because the entire theory of the so-called dual shearlets required for this purpose must first be completely re-developed.

Stay at TU Berlin: Alexander von Humboldt Fellow from May 2013 to October 2014

Host: Professor Dr. Gitta Kutyniok, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Einstein Professor, Department of Mathematics, Chair of Applied Functional Analysis

Michal Wojtylak

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Assistant Professor at the Institute of Mathematics, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland

Research Interests:
Theoretical Mathematics, applied functional analysis

Research Project at TU Berlin::
In his research project Dr. Michal Wojtylak concerns himself with the eigenvalues of matrices, investigating the mathematical background of dynamic systems. The description of characters and behaviors in mathematical series is an important research goal of current applied mathematics. Although there are many computer programs that enable the direct calculation of eigenvalues and the simulation of a mathematical system, a mathematical theory is required that helps to improve the effectiveness of existing solutions and develop new ones.
In actual fact, Dr. Wojtylak prefers to think with paper and pencil, but the computer simulation of eigenvalues has become an important part of his work. His research findings can be used in system applications, enabling procedures to take place in a more controlled manner – be it the simple control of a room temperature or highly-complex technical systems.

Stay at TU Berlin:
September 2012 to February 2014

Host: Professor Dr. Volker Mehrmann, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Department of Mathematics, Chair of Numerical Mathematics



Elisabetta Basso

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS),
Centre d'Archives de Philosophie (CAPHÉS),
Paris, France 

Research Interests:
Philosophy, Epistemology, History of Psychiatry, Phenomenology


Research Project at TU Berlin:
Dr. Elisabetta Basso, as part of the working group for Theoretical Philosophy, conducted research on Phenomenology and Psychiatry: An Epistemological History of the Term of Structure. In doing so, she went back to the beginnings of German and Swiss psychiatry in the early 20th century in order to question the conceptions relating to scientificity in psychiatry that were common then. Dr. Basso said: "I want to demonstrate to what extent the epistemological debate on objectivity and scientificity has further developed in the history of psychiatry."

Stay at TU Berlin:  Alexander von Humboldt Fellow from October 2012 to September 2013

Host: Professor Dr. Günther Abel, TU Berlin, Faculty I: Humanities, Department of Philosophy and History of Literature, Science and Technology, Chair of Theoretical Philosophy


HAN Xiaoxia

© TU/PR/ Ulrich Dahl

JSPS Postdoctoral Fellow at Kwansei Gakuin University, Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Ozaki Group, Japan

Research Interests:
Spectroscopy for protein detection

Research Project at TU Berlin:
The project of the Chinese scientist Dr. HAN Xiaoxia at TU Berlin concerns itself with the development of magnetic iron-silver nanoparticles with directed optical properties. Due to their inherent magnetic moment, these particles are particularly suited for biotechnological and medical applications such as protein separation, drug delivery and imaging diagnostics. Through the use of silver, these particles have the additional property of being able to intensify incident light at the particle surface. For this reason molecules bonded on the surface such as proteins or active substances can be examined spectroscopically. The resulting spectroscopic fingerprint enables the identification of specific molecules and the verification of their structural integrity. Thus, important prerequisites for bioseparation such as binding selectivity and biocompatability under in-situ conditions are satisfied.

Stay at TU Berlin: Alexander von Humboldt Fellow from February 2012 to July 2013

Host: Professor Dr. Peter Hildebrandt, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Office PC 14, Chair of Physical Chemistry / Biophysical Chemistry, Max Volmer Laboratory for Biophysical Chemistry


Emily J. King

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Junior Professor of Computational Data Analysis at the Center for Industrial Mathematics (ZeTeM), University of Bremen, Germany, since April 2014

Research Interests: Harmonic analysis, (fusion) frame theory, (geometric) multiscale analysis, sparse representations, atmospheric remote sensing

Research Project at TU Berlin:
Her fundamental research into shearlets has over the last ten years earned Dr. Emily King countless invitations to lectures, research stays, membership in scientific associations as well as prestigious awards and worldwide recognition. Dr. King came to Germany originally from the Mathematics Building of the Norbert Wiener Center for Harmonic Analysis and Applications (NWC) at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) and the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development, Laboratory for Integrative and Medical Biophysics, Bethesda, both in Maryland in the United States.

Stay at TU Berlin: Research fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation from December 2012 to July 2013

Host:
Professor Dr. Gitta Kutyniok, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Einstein Professor, Department of Mathematics, Chair of Applied Functional Analysis

Kristoffer Neville

© privat

Assistant Professor at the University of California (UCR), Department of the History of Art, Riverside CA, United States

Research Interests: Early modern arts, with special emphasis on architecture, prints, and sculpture; northern Europe ca. 1550-1750

Research Project at TU Berlin:

"I believe that the abundant art and architecture of the politically strongly fragmented, decentralized region of northern Europe needs to be regarded much more connectedly than has been the case until now," says Dr. Kristoffer Neville. He believes in the continuous excellence of 17th-century art production in northern Europe. The courts of Copenhagen and Stockholm, in particular, promoted major art projects. At the same time, these courts were the northernmost points in an art-promoting network that also included Munich, Vienna, Prague, Dresden and Berlin. These courts maintained close contact with one another, exchanging and gifting among themselves various works of art, such as paintings, sculptures or artistic craftwork. Their artists and architects also moved across Europe from one employer to the next, thus spreading their ideas over the continent, independently of national borders. According to Dr. Neville, language barriers in linguistically rugged Europe and thinking in national categories have so far prevented such a comprehensive perspective. In recent years, he has conducted research on this subject not only in Germany but also in Sweden, Denmark, England, and the Netherlands. He chose TU Berlin as his research location because this university has a long-standing research tradition in the field of architecture. "That attracted me very much," says Dr. Neville.

Stay at TU Berlin: Alexander von Humboldt Fellow from February 2012 to July 2013

Host: Professor Dr. Adrian von Buttlar (retired), TU Berlin, Faculty I: Humanities, Department of Art History and Historical Urbanism, Sub-Department of Art History

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Hernán Daniel Biava

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Researcher at Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Instituto de Química Rosario (IQUIR), Santa Fe, Argentina

Research Interests:
Biochemistry, de novo protein design, fluorinated proteins, redox catalysis

Research Project at TU Berlin:
Dr. Hernán D. Biava occupies himself with the insufficient stability of enzymes in organic solutions. His research area concerns the so-called 'fluorous effect', which, through the incorporation of fluorinated, hydrophobic amino acids into the enzyme structure, prevents enzymes from interacting with the organic liquid surrounding them, thus maintaining their three-dimensional structure.

Stay at TU Berlin:
Georg Forster Research Fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation from August 2011 to May 2013

Host: Professor Dr. Nediljko Budisa, TU Berlin, Faculty II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Chair of Biocatalysis, cluster of excellence UniCat

Thomas Mölg

© FAU/Georg Pöhlein

Professor of Climatology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany

Research Interests:
Climate-cryosphere relations, atmosphere-ocean dynamics and modes, space/time scales and links in the climate system, regional climate (East Africa, Tibetan Plateau), mountain meteorology; numerical modeling: glacier, atmospheric, and climate models

Research Project at TU Berlin:

Professor Thomas Mölg investigates the influence of the Asian monsoon on the Tibetan Plateau. He explains: "The monsoon is one of the most important components of global climate. It influences the lives of millions of people. Concretely, we are examining a small mountain glacier in Tibet, where Professor Scherer's research group has been carrying out measurements for quite some time." Professor Mölg's model approach allows simulations across all kinds of measuring units of the climate system. Thus, air currents, which have an effect over thousands of kilometers, can be associated with traces on the glacier. These 'traces' are typical exchange patterns of mass and energy between bottom ice and atmosphere, which can be determined through the combination of measurement and model. This leads to a local 'footprint' on the glacier, from which scientists ultimately can also draw inferences about changes of the monsoon in the past.
In 2011, Professor Mölg, who previously worked at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, received an award from the European Geosciences Union (EGU), the association of geoscientists and atmosphere scientists, as the best international young scientist in his field. He had already been awarded a similar prize in the USA in 2009. This meant he was only the fifth scientist in the world to receive the young scientist's awards of geoscience associations in both Europe and the United States. Directly after his stay at TU Berlin, Thomas Mölg was appointed professor at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU).

Stay at TU Berlin: Research fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation from October 2011 to March 2013

Host: Professor Dr. Dieter Scherer, TU Berlin, Faculty VI: Planning – Building – Environment, Department of Ecology, Chair of Climatology


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Adolfo Anta

© Private

Control Systems Researcher at GE Global Research Europe

Research Interests:
Nonlinear dynamics, networked control systems, hybrid systems

Research Project at TU Berlin:

At TU Berlin, Dr. Adolfo Anta dealt with the control of microgrids, that is, low-voltage networks in the supply grid. This topic, which may seem rather abstract from a layperson's point of view, becomes fascinating when one learns that it concerns an important component, upon which the power supply – in particular, power from renewable energy sources such as sun and wind – depends. The Spanish engineer Dr. Anta says: "Unfortunately, the availability of these resources is difficult to predict and therefore poses quite a challenge with regard to the control technology. Currently, mostly ad-hoc methods are being used because reliable procedures are lacking. In particular, I wish to develop decentralized, non-linear control procedures that exceed the efficiency of these ad-hoc techniques." His work has already attracted great attention from the professional public, for example he won the 1st National Award for Control and Electronics Engineering in Spain.

Stay at TU Berlin:
Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship for Postdoctoral Researchers from September 2010 to June 2012

Host: Professor Dr.Eng. Jörg Raisch, TU Berlin, Faculty IV: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Energy and Automation Technology, Chair of Control Systems


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[Translate to English:] Irina Bilchuk

© TU Berlin/PR/Ulrich Dahl

Associate Professor at the National Research University, Moscow State University of Civil Engineering, Russia

Research Interests: Civil Engineering Informatics

Research Project at TU Berlin:
In the field of Civil Engineering Informatics, Dr. Irina Bilchuk concerns herself with the scientific fundamentals of modules that can be combined and extended in a variety of ways, meet specific requirements quickly and be merged into software systems. Her research mainly focuses on the modeling of buildings and the processes occurring therein. It covers theories such as the three-dimensional topology of buildings, data structures and algorithms as well as graphical user interfaces adapted for engineers. Dr. Bilchuk obtained her doctorate in Civil Engineering Informatics at TU Berlin under the supervision of Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Peter Jan Pahl (retired).
Stay at TU Berlin: From 1 January 2003 to 30 June 2005, Scientific Assistant at TU Berlin in a research project of the German Research Foundation (DFG); since then, repeated research stays at TU Berlin.

Hosts: Professor Dr.Eng. Wolfgang Huhnt and Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Peter Jan Pahl (retired), TU Berlin, Faculty VI: Planning – Building – Environment, Department of Civil Engineering, Chair of Civil Engineering Informatics  

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